Learning about Valentine's customs at Swaffham Prior

Mary Humphreys

Card with gold paper
Card with piano
Mary Humphreys
Victorian card with tassel and butterfly
Mary Humphreys
Card by Mars class pupil
Mary Humphreys
Mary Humphreys
Card by Mercury class pupil
Mary Humphreys
Logbook 1919
Mary Humphreys
Logbook 1923
Mary Humphreys
Logbook 1924
Mary Humphreys
Logbook 1927
Mary Humphreys

Pupils at Swaffham Prior Primary School looked at images of Valentine’s cards kept at the Museum of Cambridge to get inspiration for making their own.

Viewing Card images from Museum

Viewing Card images from Museum

Cards in the Museum of Cambridge

The Victorian cards are very fragile. They have beautiful lace-work paper in gold and silver, pressed flowers, tassels and cut-out butterflies. The card depicting a piano was very unusual.

 

Card with gold paper

Card with gold paper

Card with piano

Card with piano

Card with tassel and butterfly

Card with tassel and butterfly

Mars and Mercury classes making cards

The children made their own cards for Valentine’s Day.  Here is a selection of them.

Card made by Mars class pupil

Card made by Mars class pupil

Card2Class2

Card by Mercury class pupil

Card by Mercury class pupil

 Valentine’s Day song

Mars and Mercury classes learnt the song that was sung in times gone by on St Valentine’s Day in the village:

Good morning Valentine, curl your locks as I do mine
Two before and two behind, good morning Valentine.

The song was written down by C.P Allix, who lived at Swaffham Prior House in 1904. The song was transcribed by him and sent to the folksong collector Lucy Broadwood, who was editor of the Folk Song Journal produced by the Folk Song Society.

 

 

 

Valentine song noted by CP Allix in 1904

Valentine song noted by CP Allix in 1904

 

You can see the original image on the Full English website.

 

C P Allix also wrote down the Plough Monday song sung by the pupils on their procession on Plough Wednesday this year. Enid Porter wrote both these songs down in her book. They were remembered by older residents, even though the customs were no longer observed in the village.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See also